Thursday, March 23, 2006

Kinky Wants Religion in Public School Classrooms

Kinky supports school prayer and posting the Ten Commandments in Texas classrooms. Neither the government nor the government's school system are the best source for teaching our children what, if anything, they ought to know about prayer and the Ten Commandments. Does Kinky even know that the Jews, the Catholics, and the Protestants have different "Ten Commandments," and if so which version is he proposing we post in all Texas classrooms?

Here is an excerpt from the Kinky interview with CBS Pittsburgh affiliate, KDKA:

"The Ten Commandments. The Ten Commandments being taken out of the public schools. I want them back," says Friedman.

Why?

"I want them back, they belong there," says Friedman....

"I'll tell you right now. I'm for prayer in school," he says.

Link to the whole story.

Click here for a comparison of the differences among the Hebrew, Catholic, and Protestant versions of the Ten Commandments.

4 Comments:

Anonymous aerialist said...

Ken Rodriguez has an excellent column about Friedman's appearance at UTSA and his non-answers on this and other issues. Rodriguez judges Friedman's platform "as meaty as cotton candy."
http://tinyurl.com/f3yyg

4:24 PM

 
Blogger StopKinky said...

I saw Ken Rodriguez's column over at the Jeffersonian (link on main page). Great column. I'll add that to the list of accumulating information about Kinky this weekend. I worry we won't see the big "oh my God, we didn't realize Kinky's nuts!" wave of news stories in the press until after the petition drive is over.

10:04 PM

 
Anonymous Glenn said...

Does Kinky even know that the Jews, the Catholics, and the Protestants have different "Ten Commandments,"

Really? Can you tell me which version this is? I always thought Exodus was Exodus was Exodus...

11:41 PM

 
Blogger StopKinky said...

Glen:

Catholics, Jews, and Protestants all follow different versions of "The Bible," with different books included or excluded. It is true that all three vesrions include Exodus 20:1-17, but the Catholics, Jews, and Protestants all interpret Exodus 20:1-17 differently so each of those faiths have a different "Ten Commandments."

Foe example, take Exodus 20:1-3:
1 And God spoke all these words, saying,
2 “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.
3 “You shall have no other gods before me."

All three faiths generally agree that Exodus 20:1 is introductory language. Catholics and Protestants believe Exodus 20:2 is further introductory language so their first Commandment is Exodus 20:3, “You shall have no other gods before me."

On the other hand, the Hebrew faith counts Exodus 20:2, “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery," as the first Commandment. Obviously, since the Jews believe Exodus 20:2 is the First Commandment, and most Christians don't, this means the Jews have to interpret Exodus 20:3-17 so that it includes only 9 Commandments (so the total remains 10) where most Christians interpret Exodus 20:3-17 as containing all Ten Commandments.

But not all Christians interpret the Exodus 20:3-17 Ten Commandments in the same manner. For example, take Exodus 20:3-6:
3 “You shall have no other gods before me.
4 “You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.
5 You shall not bow down to them or serve them, for I the Lord your God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and the fourth generation of those who hate me,
6 but showing steadfast love to thousands of those who love me and keep my commandments.

The Catholics interpret Exodus 20:3-6 as the First Commandment. The Catholic church believes Exodus 20:3, “You shall have no other gods before me," is the main idea of the First Commandment and Exodus 20:4-6 as instructions that further explain Exodus 20:3. As a result of this interpretation, the Catholics think Exodus 20:3 means you must have no gods before God and the language from Exodus 20:4 which warns “You shall not make for yourself a carved image," means you must not make a carved image of any other gods before God.

On the other hand, the Protestants think Exodus 20:3-6 sets out the First and Second Commandments. Most Protestants think Exodus 20:3, “You shall have no other gods before me," sets out the First Commandment and Exodus 20:4-6 sets out the second Commandment. As a result of this different interpretation, most Protestants believe that Exodus 20:4, which is the beginning of their Second Commandment, prohibits graven images of God where the Catholics belive that 20:4, which is further explanation of of their First Commandment, does not prohibit graven images of God but only prohibits graven images of any gods before God. This is the historical basis for the fact that the Catholic church generally embraces more religious iconography than Protestant churches.

6:48 AM

 

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